Tag: Kate Brown

Be Kind, Be Safe, Wearing a Mask Required in All Oregon Businesses Starting July 1st

Kind Leaf has been at the forefront of consumer and public safety, long before the coronavirus pandemic, taking precautions that protect everyone, including a curbside, walk-up window. Now, every Oregon business is required to enforce mask wearing inside, as The Oregonian reported:

Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday that she will require Oregonians to wear face masks everywhere in the state — not just in a handful of select counties — to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

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The governor hinted that the new statewide requirement could be a last-ditch measure against surging numbers of new cases and hospitalized patients over the past month in Oregon. Repeatedly in recent weeks, Oregon has broken records for the number of new cases.

“I do not want to have to close down businesses again like other states are now doing,” she said in a news release. “If you want your local shops and restaurants to stay open, then wear a face covering when out in public.”

Kind Leaf would like to remind its customers that wearing masks is now the law of the land, no different than checking identification, so please don’t take out the new mandate on them, or any or local business. Kind Leaf is a true Oregon-owned small business and is only following the rules required of everyone. A message from Kind Leaf that has been posted on its Facebook page:

👉🏼 We know, we know – but hey, we’ve been wearing them all along – just pretend you’re a ninja with the rest of us for the duration of the mask mandate. 😷

🎈If you do not want to wear a mask, you can totally place and online order and utilize our pick-up window – which actually gets you an extra 5% off your order- 🧾

☝🏼Please remember we are just doing as directed, our staff didn’t make the rules, but we do have to abide by them in order to remain in compliance with our regulatory requirements. 📋

✌🏼 Please do not provide our staff members with your personal political opinions – they are valuable, but others are waiting in line for our staffs time, if you would instead send an email to your state representative that would be amazing! 📝 🙌🏼

#BeKind

Kind Leaf
1733 SW Court Ave
Pendleton, Oregon
(541) 612-8588

You can order online and check out all of the great deals and products Kind Leaf has to offer on Leafly.

Unite Oregon Helping Lead the Call to Divest Cannabis Taxes from the Portland Police Bureau

As civil rights protests following the death of George Floyd have entered the third week of people taking to the streets, a remarkable set of reforms have already occurred. Those of us that have been involved with drug policy and criminal justice reform for awhile understand that much-needed changes can take years, if not decades, if happen even at all. To see new laws and regulations already implemented across the nation, from Louisville, Kentucky, passing the Breonna Taylor Law banning no-knock raids to New York finally making the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act law, and even some action taking place at the federal level, has been heartening. But much more needs to be done.

Unite Oregon has helped take the lead on reforming police funding, including calling upon the City of Portland to divest local cannabis tax dollars from funding the Portland Police Bureau. Unite’s petition calling for action includes this provision: “Divest City of Portland Cannabix Tax funds from the PPB budget and invest them into reparations for those harmed by the War on Drugs, which disproportionately targeted BIPOC communities.”

As OPB reported Portland’s local cannabis tax hasn’t been split up as voters’ intended:

When Portland voters approved a 3% tax on recreational cannabis sales in 2016, they expected the funds would benefit marijuana business owners and individuals who were negatively affected when cannabis was illegal.

report from the Portland City Auditor reveals that’s not the case. Instead, most of the collected taxes have gone toward shortages in the city’s general fund and specifically to police and transportation programs.

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Tax revenue of $3.6 million in the 2018 fiscal year and $4.6 million in 2019 primarily went toward public safety. Small business/prohibition effects received only 16% of the revenue and drug and alcohol programs received 5%.

The Portland City Council is expected to divest the local cannabis tax from the Portland Police Bureau’s budget, but as usual in the fight for civil rights, much more needs to be done. As Oregon Governor Kate Brown has called a special legislative session to deal with police accountability and the coronavirus pandemic, we can expect the issue of cannabis dollars funding law enforcement to stay in the headlines.

UPDATE: The Portland City Council did indeed cut $15 million from the police budget, including local cannabis tax dollars.

Oregon Breaks Monthly Cannabis Sales Records Two Months in a Row

The coronavirus pandemic has caused havoc across the globe, overwhelming healthcare systems and social service programs while decimating economies. Our society hasn’t experienced a similar disruption since World War II and we haven’t seen a reduction in economic activity like this since the Great Depression. Here in Oregon, the unemployment rate has surged to over 14% and Governor Kate Brown has ordered all agencies to prepare for budget cuts of 17% across the board. One bright spot for the economy: cannabis.

Oregon’s cannabis industry had its best first quarter of sales through the first three months of 2020, but it was unknown if robust commerce would continue during the COVID-19 pandemic or whether the first three months were buoyed by folks just stocking up. Well, the evidence is in and the first two months of quarantine living in the Beaver State led to new sales records.

The Willamette Week reported on the record breaking sales in March:

Sales data from the Oregon Liquor Control Commission show Oregonians bought $84.5 million worth of cannabis products in March—the most in a single month since the state legalized recreational use in 2015. The previous record, set in July 2019, was just shy of $80 million.

The March number is a 37 percent increase from this time last year. Sales per retailer averaged out to $135,000, a 30 percent jump.

Flower accounted for more than half of total sales, while concentrates and extracts made up the second-highest market share.

KGW covered April’s sales that surpassed the recording breaking numbers from just a month earlier:

There is one bright spot in the economy: marijuana sales.

In April, Oregon saw $89 million in legal marijuana sales. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission reports marijuana sales were up 45% in April, compared to last year, making April 2020 the largest month on record for the state.

Proponents believe the coronavirus pandemic could be the catalyst for other states and the federal government to legalize marijuana because it would bring tax revenue, create jobs and give the economy a much-needed shot in the arm.

There is a lot of work left to be done, but it is rather remarkable how far the Oregon cannabis industry has come since voters passed the Measure 91 legalization law with over 56% of the vote. Hamstrung by a rare-for-Oregon sales tax, a lack of banking services, unfair federal taxation, and the coronavirus pandemic, enterprising entrepreneurs and hard-working budtenders, farmers, processors, and other industry employees, have created a business sector that the cannabis community can be proud of.

With 69% of Oregon voters understanding that legalization has been a success, the future is bright for the Beaver State’s cannabis industry. By supporting craft cannabis boutique’s like Kind Leaf, you are providing a boos to our local economy and helping build one of the few flourishing business sectors in the state.

 

As Oregon Reopens,Count on Kind Leaf. Coming Soon: Curbside Window!

Oregon, like many states across the nation, is starting the process of opening more businesses back up after closing down non-essential businesses to stymie the spread of the coronavirus. The Beaver State has done relatively well flattening the curve and a vast majority of counties applied to reopen their local economies with proper guidelines that will help prevent the spread of COVID-19. As of the timing of this blog, 28 counties have received approval from Governor Kate Brown to move into Phase 1 of reopening businesses tomorrow, May 15th. Umatilla, home county for Pendleton’s Kind Leaf is one of those counties.

As The Oregonian reported counties must have met various standards for Phase 1 approval:

Benchmarks counties must meet include declining levels of COVID-19 hospital admissions over a 14-day period; minimum levels of testing and contact tracing capacity; adequate hospital surge capacity, quarantine facilities and personal protection equipment; and finalized sector guidelines from the state to communicate to individual businesses.

Under Phase 1, depending upon the business, Oregon is mandating 6 feet social distancing requirements, occupancy limits, masks worn by employees, customer logs, etc. As always, you can always count on Kind Leaf to put the safety of their community before maximizing profits, and Umatilla County entering Phase 1 doesn’t change that at all. However, hours will be returning to normal on Friday, May 15th, from 8am to 10pm.

Before this pandemic, Kind Leaf prided itself on being Eastern Oregon’s premier craft cannabis boutique, with the best selection, and a knowledgeable staff. During this health crisis, the quality of products and service hasn’t changed, but the Kind Leaf family has been determined to keep everyone, employees, vendors, customers, and everyone’s loved ones, as safe as possible, installing partitions and enacting many safety guidelines.

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Coming soon, Kind Leaf is taking safety precautions and efficiency innovations to a new level with a curbside window. You will still be able to order for curbside pickup (order online through Leafly), or come into the store (with safety precautions), but you will also have the option of going up to the curbside window. As the state opens up, it’ll be time to celebrate each and every positive step responsibly. There’s no better place to secure top-notch cannabis and cannabis products than at Kind Leaf. Now, more than ever, #BeKind.

Kind Leaf Curbside Window

Coming soon!

Get ready for a new form of pick-up at Kind Leaf – our friends at Metcalf Painting & Contracting came through and helped us make the conversion –

Now instead of having to come all the way inside for your pick-up order you can experiencing maximum #socialdistancing while picking up your preorder – this is modified curbside pickup!

#BeKind

Kind Leaf
1733 SW Court Ave
Pendleton, Oregon
(541) 612-8588
Online ordering via Leafly

Kind Leaf Responds to the Oregon Court of Appeals Blocking the State’s Ban on Flavored Cannabis Vape Cartridges

With the death toll reaching 42 and more than 2,100 serious illnesses reported, contaminated vape cartridges have rocked the cannabis and vaping industries. After Oregon first confirmed deaths and illnesses in the state, Pendleton’s Kind Leaf took the proactive approach of pulling vape cartridges that contained artificial ingredients, or couldn’t prove all-natural ingredients, off of their shelves.

Opinions may vary and I respect differences of opinions, but I personally applaud Kind Leaf’s decision and am glad that the company’s Director of Operations, Erin Purchase, has been appointed to the state commission looking into the matter. Oregon Governor Kate Brown eventually announced a temporary ban on flavored cannabis vape cartridges, but that directive was just temporarily blocked by the Oregon Court of Appeals. What happens now is anyone’s guess, but we can probably expect the Oregon Legislature to take up the issue and for formal rulemaking to take place next year.

Speaking for myself only, it seems to me that the state should be looking into the additive vitamin E acetate first and foremost since it seems to be a prime suspect. I’m also concerned about any and all non-cannabis additives and think that, at the bare minimum, every ingredient should be labeled so consumers can make informed decisions.

Once again, Kind Leaf is demonstrating real leadership on the this issue and is working with others in the industry to put consumer safety at the forefront. Kind Leaf CEO and founder Brandon Krenzler released the following statement:

We have received clarification from our regulatory agencies on what Vape pens are currently allowed on retail shelves in Oregon, after this stay on the governors blanket ban by the Oregon court of appeals.

After this information, we will begin to work with our vending partners to be provided detailed information about their products and any utilized additives. We will use this information to best make the decision as to whether or not their products are of high enough quality to be on the shelves at Kind Leaf, we are making the request that producers list each individual ingredient on their label.

We will maintain our position of a highest priority to customer care and safety. Many companies have already expressed interest in disclosing their additives on the label.

I sincerely applaud Kind Leaf’s stance on cannabis vape cartridges and hope that processors and others in the industry join them in placing the health of customers, many of whom are sick patients with compromised immune systems, ahead of simply making profits. The cannabis industry still has an opportunity to be different than other industries that have gone completely corporate and place the financial interests of shareholders over the wellbeing of our communities. Kind Leaf is certainly helping lead the way.

 

OHA, OLCC file rules banning flavored vaping sales, including online

Rules put into effect Governor’s executive order aimed at reducing youth use

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission today filed temporary rules that put into effect Gov. Kate Brown’s Oct. 4 executive order banning all flavored vaping product sales in the state.

The temporary rules, which will remain in effect for six months starting Oct. 15, prohibit the sale of all flavored vaping products—including online sales—to consumers in Oregon. The ban covers all tobacco and cannabis (marijuana and hemp) vaping products that contain natural or artificial flavors including, but not limited to, chocolate, coffee, cocoa, menthol, mint, wintergreen, vanilla, honey, coconut, licorice, nuts, fruit, any candy, dessert, alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage, herb or spice.

Tobacco-flavored tobacco or nicotine products, as well as marijuana-flavored marijuana or THC products that use only marijuana-derived flavorings, including terpenes, are not included in the ban. 

Retailers found violating the temporary rules will receive a warning letter and recommendations on coming into compliance. Continued violations could result in civil penalties of up to $500 per day, per violation. In addition, cannabis. In addition, cannabis retailers or processors could face violations up to and including cancellation of their license.

Additional components of vaping products could be banned in the future. The Governor’s executive order directs OHA and OLCC to “take immediate action and adopt additional emergency rules” to prohibit any chemical or contaminant found to have caused or contributed to vaping-associated lung injuries being investigated in Oregon and 48 other states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. There are nine cases of this illness in Oregon, including two deaths.

OHA and OLCC officials say the temporary rules filed today are significant steps toward stemming the well-documented tide of e-cigarette use and vaping by youth, as well as keeping products that may expose people to unsafe chemicals and other contaminants off store shelves.

Among Oregon high school students who use e-cigarettes exclusively, nearly 90% use flavored e-cigarette products, OHA found. And there is strong evidence that e-cigarettes increase youth nicotine addiction and increase the risk that youth will start using combustible tobacco such as cigarettes.

“We have been warning Oregonians about the health effects of these products before this current outbreak of serious lung injury added more evidence of the dangers of vaping,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist. “These rules stop the sale of a potentially dangerous product, and they’re part of a comprehensive approach to curbing youth vaping and additional cases of vaping-associated lung injuries.”

He points to additional directives in the Governor’s executive order that call on OHA and OLCC to develop consumer warnings for THC and non-THC products; expand easy access to FDA-approved cessation resources; implement a statewide prevention and education campaign; and submit legislative proposals with long-term solutions to reduce public health harms from vaping.

The temporary rules affect not only OLCCrecreational marijuana licensed retailers and processors, but also alcohol licensees that sell nicotine vaping products, including retailers that sell beer and wine, bars and taverns, and liquor store agents.

The OLCC said the flavor ban is just the latest step in its evolution from focusing on public safety to an agency with an equivalent focus on consumer protection. Through increased review of products sold in the OLCC-licensed retail market and the development of testing capacity, the OLCC will continue to work to refine consumer product disclosure.

“This Commission is working very hard to ensure the cannabis industry can grow, thrive and compete in the Oregon marketplace,” said Paul Rosenbaum, chair of the OLCC. “We are doing so with a clear focus on the integrity of the marketplace for businesses, consumers and public safety. However, it is our overwhelming responsibility to protect public health and our consumers from undue risk. This agency’s rapid and nimble action to implement the Governor’s executive order is exactly why regulated cannabis will always be a superior consumer choice over illegal markets.”

Additional rules were filed earlier this week. On Wednesday, OHA filed temporary rules that require health care providers to report hospitalizations and deaths due to “vaping-associated lung injury.” Physicians have long had to report “uncommon illness of potential public health significance,” but the new rules are intended to reduce confusion by specifically naming this new lung illness as reportable by Oregon law to public health agencies.

Due to the ongoing investigation of vaping-associated lung injuries, OHA health officials continue to recommend people stop vaping immediately. Those experiencing symptoms of the illnesses, such as shortness of breath, cough or chest pain should immediately seek medical attention.

Those needing help quitting vaping cannabis and nicotine can take advantage of a variety of cessation services, including the Oregon Quit Line, Truth Initiative, Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Helpline, and SAMHSA’s National Helpline. Information is available at healthoregon.org/vaping.

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For additional information, contact:

Mark Pettinger at 503-872-5115
Spokesperson – Recreational Marijuana Program
mark.pettinger@oregon.gov

Oregon Governor Issues 180-Day Ban on Flavored Vaping Products

NEWS RELEASE

October 4, 2019

Media Contact:

Charles Boyle, 503-931-7773

Governor Brown Issues Temporary Ban on Flavored Vaping Products, Convenes Vaping Public Health Workgroup

(Salem, OR) — Today, to address the growing public health threat of the vaping-related illness that has resulted in two deaths in Oregon and over a thousand cases of lung injury nationwide, Governor Kate Brown issued Executive Order 19-09, directing state agencies to enact a temporary ban on the sale of flavored vaping products, as well as other sources or additives as they are identified in cases of vaping-related lung injury or death.

“My first priority is to safeguard the health of all Oregonians,” said Governor Brown. “By keeping potentially unsafe products off of store shelves and out of the hands of Oregon’s children and youth, we prevent exposing more people to potentially dangerous chemical compounds, and help lessen the chance of further tragedy for any other Oregon family.

“I want to be clear though: the safest option for Oregonians right now is to not use vaping products of any kind. Until we know more about what is causing this illness, please, do not vape. Encourage your friends and family members to stop vaping immediately. Talk to your children about the dangers of vaping. The risks are far too high.” E-cigarettes are the most popular tobacco products used by Oregon’s youth, with 23 percent of Oregon 11th graders reporting using an e-cigarette in 2019, up from 13 percent in 2017.

Governor Brown also called on the federal government to act to address vaping-related illness. “This order will help protect Oregon households in the short term, but federal action is long overdue to address this national public health crisis,” said Gov. Brown. “It’s time for the FDA to regulate flavored vaping products and other additives for what they are: products that are addictive, dangerous, and targeted squarely at our youth.”

The best-available evidence from state and federal public health experts indicates that certain ingredients and compounds contained in flavored vaping products and additives have been found in cases of vaping-related lung injury and death.

The order calls for a 180-day ban on all flavored vaping products under the emergency rulemaking authority of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC). The order also directs state agencies to develop legislative proposals for long-term solutions for consideration by the Legislature.

Oregon Vape Cartridge featuring Creamsicle flavoring.

In addition to the temporary ban, the executive order calls for state agencies to develop plans within 90 days regarding:

  • Consumer warnings about the dangers of vaping
  • Ingredient disclosure for vaping products
  • Testing of vaping products to determine product safety
  • Improving health care provider reporting of vaping-related lung injuries to OHA
  • Increasing access to FDA-approved cessation services and methods
  • Establishing a statewide prevention and education campaign aimed at discouraging the use of vaping products

Executive Order 19-09 also convenes a Vaping Public Health Workgroup to advise the Governor and state agencies, examine the evidence about the causes and effects of vaping-related lung injuries, and collect stakeholder feedback and input about the vaping public health crisis. Read more information about the Vaping Public Health Workgroup.

The workgroup’s membership will consist of public health experts, including health professionals in epidemiology, pulmonology, emergency medicine, and pediatrics; Oregon’s State Public Health Officer and Epidemiologist; representatives from the Governor’s office, the Oregon Legislature, OHA, the Department of Justice, the Department of Agriculture, and OLCC; as well as members from law enforcement, the Association of Oregon Counties, and public stakeholders, including from the cannabis industry and the vaping business community. As more information about the causes of vaping-related injury and death emerges, the workgroup will make policy recommendations for lawmakers to consider and implement.

For further background, see Governor Brown’s September 26 statement on vaping-related lung injuries and fatalities and the full text of OHA’s public health warning about vaping products.
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Kind Leaf Pendleton made national news recently for being the first dispensary in the nation to take action amidst the news of spreading Vape related illnesses and deaths. Kind Leaf removed all vaping products that contained any non-cannabis additives or agents.

‘Erin Purchase, director of operations for the dispensary Kind Leaf Pendleton, says she pulled 15 vape cartridge brands off her shelves because she doesn’t know what’s in them. She says stores only receive a blanket label reading “natural and artificial flavors.’

‘The retailer does not even have access to the ‘proprietary’ ingredients or the methods behind the extraction done by the processor,’ Purchase says.”

Read More:
https://www.wweek.com/news/2019/09/11/the-cannabis-shopkeepers-selling-vape-cartridges-dont-know-whats-inside-them/