Tag: Hemp

Former FDA Chief Calls for CBD Regulations. What Exactly Is CBD?

The cannabis community is making greater and greater strides across the nation and at the federal level. While progress is moving much too slow for those that have understood the truth about cannabis, it is still rather remarkable where we have come, when back in 1996, not that long ago for an old man like me as I graduated high school that year, there weren’t any states with a medical marijuana program. Each state that moves forward and every federal development moves us closer to ending federal prohibition, and that includes success with hemp legislation and the rise of CBD.

Scott Gottlieb, the former head of the Food and Drug Administration, is now advocating for the FDA to implement regulations on CBD products. The sooner that CBD is fully recognized by Uncle Sam, the closer we will be to implementing a sane federal cannabis policy. Marijuana Moment reported on Gottlieb’s call for regulatory oversight:

To start, Gottlieb recommended targeting regulations at CBD supplements, which are not currently allowed to be marketed because FDA has yet to issue rules—but at the same time, they’ve become widely available since hemp and its derivatives were legalized under the 2018 Farm Bill.

Regulators could “put burden on producers to prove CBD safety at very low levels while ensuring manufacturing standards, purity, minimum levels of active ingredient during a transition period of enforcement discretion—and sweep market of non compliant products,” he said.

Multiple lawmakers, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), have implored FDA to use enforcement discretion when it comes to CBD and only go after those making especially exaggerated claims about their products or neglecting safety standards.

What exactly is CBD? Here’s a brief description from Dr. Lester Grinspoon, blogging over at the Harvard Health Blog:

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a “high.” According to a report from the World Health Organization, “In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

With hemp legislation recently passing, along with the SAFE banking Act on the move, we’re seeing real progress in Congress. As more states improve their laws, we’ll be seeing more and more elected officials and policymakers understand that legalization and regulation is a much better policy than prohibition. It can be frustrating waiting on those in power to catch up to the people, but know that we are winning and the truth will eventually set the cannabis plant free.

OHA, OLCC file rules banning flavored vaping sales, including online

Rules put into effect Governor’s executive order aimed at reducing youth use

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission today filed temporary rules that put into effect Gov. Kate Brown’s Oct. 4 executive order banning all flavored vaping product sales in the state.

The temporary rules, which will remain in effect for six months starting Oct. 15, prohibit the sale of all flavored vaping products—including online sales—to consumers in Oregon. The ban covers all tobacco and cannabis (marijuana and hemp) vaping products that contain natural or artificial flavors including, but not limited to, chocolate, coffee, cocoa, menthol, mint, wintergreen, vanilla, honey, coconut, licorice, nuts, fruit, any candy, dessert, alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage, herb or spice.

Tobacco-flavored tobacco or nicotine products, as well as marijuana-flavored marijuana or THC products that use only marijuana-derived flavorings, including terpenes, are not included in the ban. 

Retailers found violating the temporary rules will receive a warning letter and recommendations on coming into compliance. Continued violations could result in civil penalties of up to $500 per day, per violation. In addition, cannabis. In addition, cannabis retailers or processors could face violations up to and including cancellation of their license.

Additional components of vaping products could be banned in the future. The Governor’s executive order directs OHA and OLCC to “take immediate action and adopt additional emergency rules” to prohibit any chemical or contaminant found to have caused or contributed to vaping-associated lung injuries being investigated in Oregon and 48 other states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. There are nine cases of this illness in Oregon, including two deaths.

OHA and OLCC officials say the temporary rules filed today are significant steps toward stemming the well-documented tide of e-cigarette use and vaping by youth, as well as keeping products that may expose people to unsafe chemicals and other contaminants off store shelves.

Among Oregon high school students who use e-cigarettes exclusively, nearly 90% use flavored e-cigarette products, OHA found. And there is strong evidence that e-cigarettes increase youth nicotine addiction and increase the risk that youth will start using combustible tobacco such as cigarettes.

“We have been warning Oregonians about the health effects of these products before this current outbreak of serious lung injury added more evidence of the dangers of vaping,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist. “These rules stop the sale of a potentially dangerous product, and they’re part of a comprehensive approach to curbing youth vaping and additional cases of vaping-associated lung injuries.”

He points to additional directives in the Governor’s executive order that call on OHA and OLCC to develop consumer warnings for THC and non-THC products; expand easy access to FDA-approved cessation resources; implement a statewide prevention and education campaign; and submit legislative proposals with long-term solutions to reduce public health harms from vaping.

The temporary rules affect not only OLCCrecreational marijuana licensed retailers and processors, but also alcohol licensees that sell nicotine vaping products, including retailers that sell beer and wine, bars and taverns, and liquor store agents.

The OLCC said the flavor ban is just the latest step in its evolution from focusing on public safety to an agency with an equivalent focus on consumer protection. Through increased review of products sold in the OLCC-licensed retail market and the development of testing capacity, the OLCC will continue to work to refine consumer product disclosure.

“This Commission is working very hard to ensure the cannabis industry can grow, thrive and compete in the Oregon marketplace,” said Paul Rosenbaum, chair of the OLCC. “We are doing so with a clear focus on the integrity of the marketplace for businesses, consumers and public safety. However, it is our overwhelming responsibility to protect public health and our consumers from undue risk. This agency’s rapid and nimble action to implement the Governor’s executive order is exactly why regulated cannabis will always be a superior consumer choice over illegal markets.”

Additional rules were filed earlier this week. On Wednesday, OHA filed temporary rules that require health care providers to report hospitalizations and deaths due to “vaping-associated lung injury.” Physicians have long had to report “uncommon illness of potential public health significance,” but the new rules are intended to reduce confusion by specifically naming this new lung illness as reportable by Oregon law to public health agencies.

Due to the ongoing investigation of vaping-associated lung injuries, OHA health officials continue to recommend people stop vaping immediately. Those experiencing symptoms of the illnesses, such as shortness of breath, cough or chest pain should immediately seek medical attention.

Those needing help quitting vaping cannabis and nicotine can take advantage of a variety of cessation services, including the Oregon Quit Line, Truth Initiative, Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Helpline, and SAMHSA’s National Helpline. Information is available at healthoregon.org/vaping.

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For additional information, contact:

Mark Pettinger at 503-872-5115
Spokesperson – Recreational Marijuana Program
mark.pettinger@oregon.gov

CBD – A Basic Look.

What is CBD?

CBD, or Cannabidiol is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that has shown enormous potential both medically and scientifically. CBD is found in Industrial Hemp and other varietals of Feminized Cannabis

Where can I find that?

Kind Leaf Pendleton is a great resource for beginners seeking to explore the implementation of CBD into their daily routines. We have knowledgeable staff that are here to guide you through your visit. We take the time to ensure that you have a basic understanding of the product you are purchasing, and can inform you of places to learn more about cannabis and its derivatives.

Project CBD, Leafly, and Ladybud are a few great resources to learn more.

Opening a discussion about CBD should not be difficult, just ask how it would work for you.


Can I speak with my doctor about CBD?
Absolutely! being open with your care provider about your interest in CBD or even THC can enhance your relationship and provide you with information that a dispensary consultant cannot. 

What should one look for when choosing a CBD-rich product?

Look for products with clear labels showing the quantities and ratio of CBD and/or THC per dose. Select products with quality ingredients, best practice is to avoid corn syrup, artificial additives, thinning agents or artificial preservatives, even though products on the market can contain them. CBD-rich products produced and sold in Oregon are lab tested for consistency and purity, so be sure to look for the lab analysis information on the label. 

What is a stand by product for a novice interested in trying CBD?

Erin Purchase showcases Select CBD Tinctures.

We often recommend SELECT® brand CBD tinctures as a great entry point into using CBD. They have a great flavor from the added essential oils and they are very versatile. 

Select Tinctures can be used both topically and orally, both applications have been proven useful.

If you are more interested in an edible option other than tincture, one of our hot items in house is Wyld CBD which are rich, flavorful gummy candies made from real fruit, infused with quality cannabis oil.

Come visit Kind Leaf, we can enhance your awareness of CBD. We always recommend consulting with your physician about the potential positive impacts of CBD. 


Kind Leaf
1733 SW Court Avenue
Pendleton, Oregon 97801

(541) 612-8588
www.kindleafpendleton.com

Cannabis Consumption for Beginners

In many instances, a negative initial experience may be enough for someone to tragically banish cannabis from their life forever. Typically the reason for doing so has to do with the anxious, uncomfortable and even paranoia inducing side effects associated with consumption of high levels of THC; but what first-timers might not realize is there are ways to minimize unpleasant feelings and experiences.

For novices, lightweights and low-tolerance consumers, Kind Leaf has a recommendation for finding that perfect first-time experience.

Look for CBD rich Cannabis Strains!

Unlike THC, CBD is a relatively non-psychoactive compound with both relaxing and medicinal properties. CBD can actually help mitigate and even counteract THC associated anxiety, so it’s a perfect starting point for new users.

You’ll often find strains that contain equal parts THC and CBD, but some contain almost no THC at all. Beginning your journey with a CBD rich strain can assist in building the tolerance needed for individuals to experience more potent strains and cannabis infused products. Remember to start low and go slow if you are not a regular cannabis consumer. 

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of at least 113 active cannabinoids identified in cannabis. It is a major phytocannabinoid, accounting for up to 40% of the plant’s extract. 

​CBD is considered to have a wide scope of potential medical applications – due to clinical reports showing the lack of side effects, particularly a lack of psychoactivity (as is typically associated with ∆9-THC), and non-interference with several psychomotor learning and psychological functions.

Kind Leaf Staff-