Tag: Cannabis Industry

It’s Time for Cannabis Careers to Get the Respect that They Deserve

The media loves loves love reporting on the big sales and tax revenue numbers that legal cannabis businesses generate. They don’t do as good of a job demonstrating the full economic benefit that regulated cannabis commerce has brought to states across the nation, and outlets often can’t resist having some time of punny headline about “Smoking Sales Expectations” or “The Green Rush” and our society of large certainly doesn’t give the proper amount of respect to the cannabis community and the hardworking folks operating small businesses.

Most people have zero clue the amount of work that goes into making a living in the industry or that the lack of banking access and other regulatory headaches hinder the livelihood of workers throughout the industry, not just dispensaries, cultivators, and processors. Hopefully, that will change over time as people become more educated and cannabis moves more mainstream.

Writing for Green Entrepreneur, Grup Flor’s Gavin Kogan, makes some excellent points:

“Cannabis professional” not an oxymoron. There’s perhaps no other industry in modern history that is so multi-faceted, requiring some level of knowledge or expertise across so many different disciplines. After all, we are creating an entire industry from one end of the supply chain to the other, entirely from scratch. From the agricultural issues of cultivation to the engineering aspects of manufacturing to the legal and regulatory requirements surrounding local consumer shops, cannabis requires the business acumen so common in more traditional industries

According to ArcView Market Research, the cannabis industry will employ well over 400,000 people in the US by 2021. By conservative estimates, there are already 211,000 cannabis jobs across the United States now, of which 64,000 were added just in 2018. As more states legalize cannabis, employment needs and opportunities will grow exponentially.

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As parents, educators and business owners, let’s legitimize cannabis as a serious career path for those eager to learn and join such a dynamic industry. It’s time to put the stigma of the product behind us and appreciate the impact cannabis is, and will, have on our economy.

Slowly but surely, we are debunking so many myths about cannabis and people that utilize the plant, but that slow progress can be so frustrating. I often wonder if those working in the beer, wine, and liquor industries suffered similar stigmatization after federal alcohol prohibition was repealed or if changing the law across the land helped legitimize their career paths.

Recently, I attended a hearing of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC), the agency that regulates both alcohol and cannabis in the Beaver State. It is easy to see that cannabis is still considered second fiddle to alcohol, even though cannabis generates more tax revenue than beer and wine for the state by far. I was envious of the respect that OLCC Commissioners gave representatives of liquor distributors and small wineries and left motivated to help ensure that the cannabis community and industry achieves the respect and recognition that we deserve. Step by step, we’re gonna get there.

Just Say No to Higher Cannabis Taxes

Operating a licensed and regulated cannabis business is an extremely tough endeavor. After working towards drug policy reform for about 20 years before living in a state with legal cannabis commerce among all adults, I have received a crash course in the last four years about the ins and outs of running a cannabis business from clients, friends, and regulators. The truth of the matter is that profiting from legal cannabis sales is an extremely difficult task because of regulatory hurdles and tax burdens. The federal 280e tax code that prohibits cannabis entrepreneurs from deducting normal business expenses (rent, payroll, etc.) is the most damaging. High (I know, pun intended) taxes on cannabis are another serious barrier, making prices unaffordable for those with lower incomes, and encouraging people to shop on the illicit market.

California, already hurting businesses with a heavy tax burden, are raising taxes even further. The Golden States should reverse course, and other states should not follow suit, they should look to go in the opposite direction and keep taxes law to benefit local businesses and allow the regulated market to keep pace with the prices in the unregulated economy. The San Jose Spotlight reported on the tax hike:

The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration “stunned and outraged” the business side of California’s cannabis market when it announced in November that taxes would go up in January, the California Cannabis Industry Association said in a statement.

The association said California adding more taxes, as the state’s nascent recreational cannabis market “spirals towards collapse” would “drive consumers to the illicit market at a time when illicit products are demonstrably putting people’s lives at risk.”

California collects a 15% excise tax from cannabis consumers and San Jose collects an additional 10%. Every transaction also includes a sales tax that is at least the 9.25% charged by the state on all consumer transactions and maybe more when cities and counties have their own sales taxes. Those rates will remain the same in 2020, but retailers will face a 12.5% bump in taxes and farmers will see an increase of more than 4%.

Like many consumers, the cannabis community is very price conscious. Further, cannabis consumers are comprised of many patients on limited incomes and with plenty of people that know how to acquire flower and other products through underground connections. Too heavy of a tax burden will disproportionately hurt sick and disabled patients and mom-and-pops, as the wealthy and multinational companies can easily handle price increases.

Keeping taxes low will better help everyday citizens and the small businesses that truly power and invest in our local communities and neighborhoods. California was the first state to legalize medical cannabis and I’m pleased that they helped show the way, but let’s not follow the state’s example on taxes, unfortunately, as the Golden State is going completely in the wrong direction.

Legal Cannabis Retailers Doing a Great Job Preventing Sales to Minors

Reefer Madness fear mongering has been a staple of prohibitionists for decades, but the truth about cannabis has been debunking each myth one by one. The fear tactics originally started with outrageous claims, like folks turning deranged, that a basic understanding of the plant and those that utilize it revealed that the stories were nonsense. The denial of medicinal properties has melted away as a majority of states legalized medical use and predictions of highway carnage have proven to be false as well.

The fact that regulated cannabis would do a better job of preventing sales to minors than the illicit market would take some studying, and now, the results are coming in, and legal retail outlets are indeed checking identification and turning away underage would-be buyers. A recent study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs found that cannabis retailers in Washington and Colorado, the first two states that legalized cannabis commerce to all adults, did a better job than alcohol establishments of denying purchases by those underage. Washington State retailers denied those under 21 86.6% of the time, while Colorado stopped minors 92.6% of the time. Marijuana Moment reported on the study:

The authors highlight that “refusal rates exceeded those for alcohol and are similar to those for tobacco.” In other words, the policies and regulations of the cannabis industry in Colorado and Washington could be used as potential models for other states looking to legalize recreational marijuana sales.

The findings are comparable to a sting operation conducted by Oregon regulators last year that showed a 100 percent compliance rate by licensed marijuana stores in not selling to underage individuals.

According to the new Colorado and Washington study, when it comes to cannabis, “regulators in both states worked with the industry, performed compliance checks, and penalized stores that failed.”

Those in the cannabis industry have a huge interest in ensuring that cannabis stays out of the hands of those under the age of 21 as minors’ brains are still developing and noncompliance with identification checks will lead to a backlash against legalization. Licensed and regulated cannabis retail outlets should be commended for their efforts in checking IDs and preventing sales to minors, helping prove, once again, that legalization is a better policy than prohibition.

Cannabis Community Must Rally to Pass Banking Bill in the U.S. Senate

Those thinking that the cannabis industry is a get-quick-rich plan are most likely to be severely disappointed. A long list of obstacles hinder cannabis businesses from over regulation to over taxation, at all levels of government. The lack of access to banking services is one major hurdle for hard working entrepreneurs that are foundational pioneers in the burgeoning industry. The lack of a bank account poses enough problems, but without the business loans and other programs available to other industries, growth is severely stifled.

Thanks to the diligence of advocates, we won a major victory by passing the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Act at the United States House this year, but unfortunately the much-needed banking bill faces a tough path in the Senate. Passage in the Senate will take a strong lobbying effort by the cannabis community after Idaho Senator Mike Crapo, while open to passing banking legislation, announced his opposition to the SAFE banking Act, as Marijuana Moment reported:

A powerful Senate committee chairman said on Wednesday the he opposes House-passed marijuana banking legislation and laid out potential changes he would like to see to the bill before he takes it up in his panel.

Among other amendments being floated for public feedback is a 2 percent THC potency limit on products in order for cannabis businesses to qualify to access financial services as well as blocking banking services for operators that sell high-potency vaping devices or edibles that could appeal to children.

“I remain firmly opposed to efforts to legalize marijuana on the federal level, and I am opposed to legalization in the State of Idaho,” Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID), who chairs the Senate Banking Committee, said in a press release. “I also do not support the SAFE Banking Act that passed in the House of Representatives. I have significant concerns that the SAFE Banking Act does not address the high level potency of marijuana, marketing tactics to children, lack of research on marijuana’s effects, and the need to prevent bad actors and cartels from using the banks to disguise ill-gotten cash to launder money into the financial system. I welcome input from all interested parties on how to thoughtfully address these concerns.”

Regardless of one’s stance on cannabis legalization, everyone should support banking access for industry participants. The SAFE Banking Act will help businesses grow, creating more jobs and generating more revenue. Public safety and prompt tax payments will also improve if banking services are fully legalized. The lack of banking services hurts small and medium businesses the most and these mom-and-pops and craft cannabis boutiques need our support, both with our dollars and our political activism.

The future of the cannabis industry depends upon our community shopping with local companies and urging our elected officials, especially United States Senators, to treat the industry like any other business sector. It certainly seems like Idahoans need to contact Senator Crapo and it is imperative that we make our voices heard. We’ve come a long way, we just need to remain vigilant and keep making progress for the cannabis community step by step, piece by piece, law by law.

LaRain Miller of Kind Leaf wins National Budtender Award

Las VegasThe first annual Budtender Awards took place at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in sunny Las Vegas, Nevada. The Budtender Awards team developed 9 unique award categories referred to as the OG Awards.

Each category hosted five finalists. These five individuals were selected from over 700 international nominees! Finalists were announced August 30th on High Times’ 420 Live Instagram show.

These Award Winners were chosen by industry experts & members of the Budtender Awards team based upon a variety of factors such as votes earned, participation and social media blasts. The winners were announced at the Award Show on October 12th, 2019 at Light Nightclub.

LaRain Miller accepting her award from “Modest Jones” & “Wolfie”

LaRain Miller of Kind Leaf Pendleton won the first ever National Budtender Awards trophy for the “Dazed & Infused” category.

According to the Budtender Awards, “This Budtender is the Martha Stewart, or Emeril of Edibles. Their sophistication and superior knowledge ranging from infusing pastries & sweets to drinks to oils & butters, gives them the skills to recommend the perfect product for every user. Who knows, maybe they’ll be the next Michelin star cannabis Chef. “

BUDTENDER

| ˈbudˌtendər |

An award winning budtender is a person who recreates and redefines the public perception of someone who works in a dispensary or store where medical or recreational cannabis is sold. Helping provide a perspective that these knowledgeable individuals are not just “Drug Dealers.”

Cannabis Flower at Kind Leaf in Pendleton, Oregon

Increasingly, this subculture is evolving into a group of educated professionals who have developed their unique blend of personality, style, fashion, and most importantly, their recommendations to an constantly growing and changing variety of cannabis offerings. Budtenders are educators, advisors, sales professionals and often a trusted resource or friend to their customers.

Kind Leaf Budtender weighing out Cannabis for a customer

Without Budtenders, Cannabis brands do not succeed, the customers are left unaware of what makes each product and brand different from the one resting next to it on the shelf. Budtenders are one of the most important factors in public relations between communities, dispensaries and the cannabis industry as a whole.

The 2019 Budtender Awards honored these individuals, promoted their efforts and acknowledged their influence on the industry, and in the communities they serve.

Congratulations to LaRain Miller, Kind Leaf for bringing home an award, for yourself, your team, your community and Oregon!

#BeKind

Kind Leaf
1733 SW Court Ave
Pendleton, Oregon
(541) 612-8588
http://www.kindleafpendleton.com