Tag: Aaron Ford

Nevada Pardons Over 15,000 with Cannabis Convictions, Let’s Do This Nationwide

Cannabis prohibition has always been a terrible policy, but it is getting even more embarrassing to defend as each day passes. Reefer Madness prohibitionists can try all they want to rely upon decades of propaganda to prop up the racist and failed war on cannabis, but, when given the chance, voters would legalize nationwide. Even many that oppose cannabis use now see that our country has too many serious issues to tackle to waste limited resources citing, arresting, jailing, prosecuting, and jailing people for cannabis.

Nevada has taken a great step in the fight to right the wrongs of cannabis prohibition by pardoning over 15,000 people of their convictions. These folks can now become full members of society, getting their Second Amendment rights back and having their ability to vote restored, among other rights and privileges that have been denied to them for far too long.

Marijuana Moment reported:

The measure extends unconditional clemency to individuals with possession convictions of up to one ounce from January 1986 to January 2017. It was introduced to the board by Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) last week.

“Today is an historic day for those who were convicted of what has long been considered a trivial crime, and is now legal under Nevada law,” the governor said in a press release. “Since the passage of [adult-use legalization] in 2016 and the decriminalization of possession for small amounts of marijuana, many Nevadans have had these minor offenses remain on their records, in some cases as a felony. This resolution aims to correct that and fully restore any rights lost as a result of these convictions.”

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“Today we took another step toward justice by pardoning thousands of Nevadans for actions that Nevadans decided should no longer be illegal,” state Attorney General Aaron Ford (D) said. “I’m proud to work alongside Governor Sisolak to make it easier for these Nevadans to get jobs, housing, and financial aid for college. Together, we’re making criminal justice reform a priority across Nevada.”

We need to take this movement to pardon people persecuted by the war on cannabis nationwide and look for ways that we can right wrongs of our past. Too many tax-paying-otherwise-law-abiding citizens have had their educational and employment opportunities squashed by a racist and harmful policy that a vast majority of Americans now realize was a mistake. Legalization is great, but it’s just a first step of reconciling the sins of our past when it comes to cannabis prohibition.