Month: November 2020

Federal Cannabis Legalization Vote Expected This Week

About a month after cannabis legalization won big at the 2020 ballot box across the nation, the United States House of Representatives is now expected to finally follow the will of the people and vote on ending cannabis this week. With a supermajority of Americans now favoring legalization, it certainly seems that now is the time for the U.S. House to cast a historic vote against a failed and racist war that has been waged for far to long against the cannabis community.

Pete Danko of the Portland Business Journal reported:

Majority Leader Steny Hoyer late last week advised members that the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act — the MORE Act — would be among bills taken up by the House sometime between Wednesday evening and Friday.

The bill would de-schedule cannabis, expunge many convictions, tax sales at 5%, invest in grant programs with a heavy focus on social equity and give cannabis businesses access to Small Business Administration loans.

The Congressional Cannabis Caucus, co-founded and co-chaired by Oregon’s own Earl Blumenauer issued a letter to their House colleagues, urging them to pass the MORE Act to take a big step towards ending the federal War on Drugs. Blumenauer, along with co-chair Barbara Lee, stated that “This is a critical issue of racial justice, and the failed war on drugs has devastated communities of color, especially Black and brown communities. We can no longer ignore our duty to repair the damage that this harmful form of systemic racism has done.”

While passage in the Senate isn’t likely so long as Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell is in charge, it will be a big historic moment for the United States House of Representatives, the People’s House, to vote to legalize cannabis. Passage of the MORE Act will be one more step to ending a failed Drug War policy, and one more step towards freedom and equality for the cannabis community. Please contact your representative and urge them to support ending the harmful policy of cannabis prohibition.

The CCC’s full letter to House Colleagues:

Dear Colleague:  

One of the biggest winners of the 2020 election was cannabis reform. Americans in five very different states voted overwhelmingly to liberalize their cannabis policies and it is clearer than ever that the American people are demanding a change to outdated cannabis laws. There’s no question: cannabis prohibition will end soon. We should lead the way by passing H.R.3884 – Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act.  

Last week’s results reaffirm the strong bipartisan support to reform our failed cannabis prohibition. Even in states where Republicans easily swept elections, like in Mississippi and South Dakota, cannabis-related ballot measures passed with strong support. The success in Arizona, Montana, Mississippi, New Jersey and South Dakota means that cannabis will be legal for adult use in 15 states and medical use in 36 states. More than 109 million people will live in states where cannabis is legal for adults to use, that is more than one in three Americans. In total, almost 99% of Americans will live in states with some form of legal cannabis. We cannot ignore the will of the people any longer.   

This comes as no surprise—national support for federal cannabis legalization is at an all-time high, and trends show that support will continue to grow. Polling from the Pew Research Center shows that 67% of registered voters think “the use of cannabis should be made legal,” and the Center for American Progress found that 73% support expunging the records of those previously convicted of cannabis-related offenses. This finding is confirmed by the fact that in the last three elections, 16 of the 18 pro-cannabis reform ballot initiatives were successful—even in places like Utah and Mississippi. 

This past election further demonstrated that cannabis reform is popular, non-partisan, and the just thing to do as states have also made clear their commitment to restorative justice. Montana, which ranks first in the country for having the largest racial disparities for cannabis arrests will allow an individual currently serving a sentence for a prior low-level cannabis offense to apply for resentencing or an expungement of the conviction. 

The recent success of cannabis reform in states around the country should give us a new sense of urgency to ensure Congress catches up with the American people. This is a critical issue of racial justice, and the failed war on drugs has devastated communities of color, especially Black and Brown communities. We can no longer ignore our duty to repair the damage that this harmful form of systemic racism has done.

The House was poised to vote on the MORE Act, the most comprehensive federal cannabis reform legislation we’ve ever seen, back in September. As the House kept our focus on providing struggling Americans with relief from COVID-19, we received commitment from our Caucus leadership that Congress would take steps to end the failed war on drugs by voting on the MORE Act before the year was over.   

We have an opportunity and duty to correct course now. As we head into the lame-duck session, we must remember the promise we made to the American people to pass the MORE Act. 

Thank you for your urgency.

Be Kind This Thanksgiving

With everything that 2020 has thrown our way, this Thanksgiving is one unlike any other. Life can seem overwhelming at times because it is overwhelming at times. Even in tough times there are still many reasons to be thankful and there are always reasons to be kind, as virtually everyone is suffering somehow this year.

In addition to amazing family and friends, I’m definitely thankful for everyone that works to end the Drug War and bring more freedom and equality to the cannabis community. Cannabis legalization and drug policy reform measures won huge victories at the ballot box this year and I know firsthand how much work advocates put in to win statewide campaigns.

I also understand that the work to win those campaigns started many years before, as the advocates winning hard-earned victories today stand on the shoulders of the many giants who came before them. Some of the activists a lot of us know, like Jack Herer, Dennis Leary, and Dennis Peron. Some might fly under the radar like Debby Goldsberry and Oregon’s own Elvy Musikka. In addition to well-known names, there are so many people that have put in long hours and have sacrificed so much so that we can be in a position to pass meaningful reforms today.

Just as so many people have done great work without fanfare, so many people are suffering and traumatized without any visible signs to us. We can get caught up in our own lives too much (I’m certainly guilty of this) and we forget to check in on others, or have as much empathy as we should. This Thanksgiving, let’s be as thankful and has empathetic as possible.

Just a reminder, that Kind Leaf will be closed #Thanksgiving day so that the hardworking staff can enjoy the day with #Family and #Friends. Kind Leaf hopes that you enjoy your day and Eastern Oregon’s premier craft cannabis boutique will be open normal hours again on Friday! Come in and check out the awesome #GreenFriday and #SmallBusinessSaturday specials~#BeKind

When Shopping for Thanksgiving Supplies, Don’t Forget the Deals at Kind Leaf

Thanksgiving is a lot of work. Even with many Thanksgiving dinners being smaller this year, they still take a ton of effort to satisfy everyone’s taste buds and providing traditional dishes that people have grown to love.

When you’re out securing supplies and stocking up for festivities, and your anywhere near beautiful Pendleton, Oregon, you’ll want to stop into Kind Leaf today or tomorrow to purchase from the biggest and best selection of cannabis strains and products in the state, if not the entire Northwest. Kind Leaf closes on Thanksgiving so employees can enjoy the holiday, so don’t forget. After Thanksgiving, come back to Kind Leaf to enjoy Green Friday and Small Business Saturday specials.

This week’s deals:

FLOWER 15% OFF – Chemdawg, Dr. Leveque, Sunset Sherbert, Dogwalker OG

FLOWER 30% OFF – Lite Me Up

EDIBLES 30% OFF – Muru Cannamixer, SDK 1:1 & thc Cookies EDIBLES 15% OFF – Serra Edibles, Gron Mega Pearls

EXTRACT 15% OFF – Willamette Valley Alchemy Shatter, Sugar Tree Extract

VAPE 15% OFF – Buddies Cartridges

VAPE 30% OFF – Highland Provisions Cartridges

PREROLLS 30% OFF – Yerba Buena & Loyal

Remember that Kind Leaf always honors veterans, senior citizens, and OMMP patients with discounts. Order online via Leafly and utilize the pickup window to get an additional 5% off your order.

When you support Kind Leaf, you are supporting a local business that gives back to its local community, not just in providing jobs and revenue, but in projects such as the Kind Tree program that benefits families in need of some assistance providing a fun Christmas for their children. Have a great Thanksgiving holiday everybody, please be safe and be kind.

Clackamas County, Oregon, Prosecutors Decriminalize Drugs Today

Following the passage of Oregon Measure 91 in 2014, several county prosecutors effectively legalized cannabis months before the landmark legalization law went into effect. Now, we are starting to see the same treatment of all drugs following the passage of Measure 110 with over 58% of the vote on November 3rd. The Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office sent out an email to all police chiefs in their jurisdiction that their office will stop prosecuting minor drug possession cases effective today, on November 23rd, a few months before the law officially goes into effect on February 1, 2021.

The email from Clackamas County Chief Deputy District Attorney Chris Owen to law enforcement heads within the county:

Dear Chiefs:

As you are aware, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, which decriminalizes, among other things, possession of up to 1 gram of heroin, 2 grams of methamphetamine and cocaine, 12 grams of psilocybin, 40 user units of LSD 40 pills/capsules containing synthetic opiates.

The measure takes effect on February 1, 2021. At that time, persons found to be in possession of these controlled substances will be referred to local municipal or justice courts and subject to the newly created Class E infraction, which carries a maximum $100 fine. This fee will be waived if the offender provides proof of participation in a substance abuse assessment. There is no requirement that the person engage in treatment.

As the voting public has overwhelmingly passed this measure, effective 11/23/20 the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office will stop charging new Unlawful Possession of Controlled Substance cases that will otherwise be decriminalized on February 1. It is our belief that having officers investigate and submit cases for a prosecution in the weeks leading up to February 1, which will not lead to any sanction or court supervised treatment, is not the most effective use of criminal justice resources.

While we fundamentally disagree with this measure, ceasing to prosecute these matters prior to February 1 is consistent with the will of the voters, which we must respect.

Investigations where a juvenile is found to possess controlled substances in amounts that will be decriminalized should still be referred to the Juvenile Department so the juvenile can have the opportunity for supervised treatment. There is a juvenile workgroup convening who will eventually offer guidance about what to do with juvenile referrals after February 1.

Until February 1, misdemeanor PCS is still unlawful. The decision of our office is not intended not divest local law enforcement officers the ability to conduct lawful investigations, searches and arrests. 

Good communication about this significant change is paramount. If you have any questions or need clarification about this decision, I encourage you or anyone in your agencies to contact me directly. We look forward to our presentation on December 15th where we will discuss additional specifics of M110 and its search and seizure implications.

Chris Owen

Chief Deputy District Attorney

Clackamas County DA’s Office

The Oregon cannabis community can be proud of leading the fight against the failed and harmful Drug War. As the first state to decriminalize cannabis back in 1973 and among the early states of legalizing medical and adult use cannabis (in 1998 and 2014, respectively), Oregonians are true pioneers, putting a sledgehammer to the War on Drugs, by decriminalizing drugs in 2020.

Measure 110 was made possible by cannabis law reforms passing first and that more than $100 million dollars have become available to fund drug treatment and recovery services from larger-than-expected cannabis tax revenue. When you support local dispensaries like Pendleton’s Kind Leaf, you are helping fund a variety of social programs, including more drug treatment beds, hiring more recovery mentors, housing programs, and job training services.

It’s great to see Clackamas County prosecutors ending unnecessary prosecutions early. Hopefully, other county district attorneys will follow suit. Step by step, we are saying “No More Drug War” and it’s so great to see Oregon leading the way.

Another Historic Cannabis Moment: Mexico’s Senate Votes to Legalize

As the United States continues to make slow, steady progress towards ending cannabis prohibition, our neighbor to the south is helping show the way. With Canada already leading the way, the U.S. is in danger of falling behind Mexico as the Mexican Senate just voted to legalize. The Chamber of Deputies now has to pass the bill and President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has already stated his support.

Like the debate in the U.S., as we are seeing both federally and in states like New Jersey, the issue isn’t just whether cannabis should be legalized (it should, of course), but around how the plant and its products should be legalized and regulated. Marijuana Moment reported:

While advocates have celebrated the advancement of cannabis reform through the legislature, they have fought hard for changes to better protect consumers’ rights and promote social equity in the legal market. Namely, they remain concerned about high penalties that can be imposed for violating the cannabis rules and feel the bill should do more to allow opportunities for small farmers.

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That said, Ricardo Monreal, the ruling MORENA party’s coordinator in the Senate, argued last week that the proposal is a significant improvement on current laws against possession, which have “only caused the detention centers to be full of people for possession of a few grams of cannabis, which is why they seek to reduce the penalties in carrying of this product.”

In a column published on the senator’s website on Sunday, he said the “intensity, duration and complexity of the discussion reflects the desire to achieve the pacification of a country that for years has been a victim of violence caused by drug trafficking, as well as the will to respect the right to free development of the personality, at the same time that favorable conditions are generated to expand national economic development,” according to a translation.

With 68% of U.S. voters supporting cannabis legalization, it is going to be an embarrassment if we are the last North American nation to end prohibition. Let’s get our act together so that our farmers and entrepreneurs can truly flourish.

United States House Plans Cannabis Legalization Vote Next Month

The United States House made the erroneous decision to NOT vote on ending federal cannabis prohibition before the November 3rd elections, only to see state legalization bills pass across the nation. Now, with public support at an all-time high, a vote is expected in December, according to Majority Leader Steny Hoyer who announced that the “House will vote on the MORE Act to decriminalize cannabis and expunge convictions for non-violent cannabis offenses that have prevented many Americans from getting jobs, applying for credit and loans, and accessing opportunities that make it possible to get ahead in our economy.”

Fox 17 reported:

Under the bill, marijuana would be removed from the list of scheduled substances under the Controlled Substances Act and criminal penalties for those who manufacture, distribute, or possess marijuana would be eliminated.

In addition, the bill would impose a 5% tax on cannabis products to be deposited in a trust fund which would support various programs to communities impacted by the war on drugs. Among other actions, it would also expunge convictions related to federal cannabis offenses.

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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has also created a message form for those who support the bill to contact their local representative. The organization says passage of the bill would help end racial disparities in marijuana arrest rates.

While passage of the bill is uncertain, especially in the Senate, it will be a historic event to just hold the vote. The House passing the bill, which is very likely, will be another huge step forward in our fight for freedom. You can use the ACLU’s message form, or contact your legislators directly to help continue our momentum in our fight for freedom and equality.

This Must End. Another Military Veteran Fired for Medical Cannabis Usage

The use of medical cannabis, when legal under state law, should not be a fireable offense when there is no impairment on the job. Full stop. It’s maddening to see record-breaking support for cannabis legalization and yet the cannabis community still treated as second class citizens when it comes to employment, and a whole host of other issues. It is even more infuriating when medical cannabis patients that served our nation in the military fired without any proof that cannabis impaired them on the job whatsoever.

The case of Mike Hickman, a Florida marine vet and state-legal patient who fought in Iraq during Gulf Storm 30 years ago, is just the latest outrage. The Marion County School Board fired Hickman, a dean at the school, when he tested positive for cannabis after he was injured breaking up a fight at the school as the Orlando Sentinel reported:

The central Florida district offered to suspend Hickman, 51, if he agreed not to use medical marijuana in the future, but the 10-year employee refused. After an administrative judge upheld a previous superintendent’s recommendation that he be fired, the board acted.

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Hickman’s attorney, Mark Herdman, told the Ocala Star-Banner, “It is just another unfortunate decision handed down by the Marion County School Board to fire yet another good employee.” Hickman argued it was unfair that he legally could have kept using the opioid painkiller he took before switching to marijuana because it was more effective and has fewer side effects.

Chris Altobello, an executive director with the Marion County teachers union, told the paper in a text message that Hickman “was no more impaired than someone who took an aspirin for a headache. They implied that this is tantamount to smoking pot in the boys bathroom!”

It’s getting real tiresome hearing about the inevitability of ending cannabis prohibition AND how our nation honors military veterans and then learning about too many stories of vets getting punished for utilizing medicinal cannabis. Are we really honoring and respecting our military veterans when we push them to use alcohol and opiates, while penalizing them for using medical cannabis? Stories like this inspire me to work even harder for true freedom and equality for the cannabis community. Especially our veterans.

Kind Leaf, Eastern Oregon’s premier craft cannabis boutique always honors veterans with a standing discount. There are also discounts for senior citizens, OMMP patients, and for utilizing the pickup window.

Oregon Lockdown Part 2: Stock Up on Cannabis, NOT Toilet Paper

No matter where you stand on the political debate of restricting our economy to curtail the spread of the coronavirus, the truth of the matter is that COVID is spreading rapidly across the nation and healthcare professionals are urging people to take precautions. And it’s a fact that Oregon’s new economic lockdown, on the orders of Governor Kate Brown, starts on November 18th and will go on for two weeks and likely even longer.

OPB reported:

“Maybe we thought the fight was over, but it’s not,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, the state epidemiologist. “This is likely the most dangerous time in Oregon.”

New regulations include:

  • Limiting restaurants and bars to take-out service only.
  • Closing gyms and other indoor recreational facilities, museums, and indoor entertainment like theaters.
  • Closing outdoor recreational facilities, zoos, gardens, and entertainment venues. City parks and playgrounds will remain open.
  • Requiring all businesses to mandate that employees work from home when possible, and to close offices to the public.
  • Limiting grocery and retail stores to 75% capacity and encouraging curbside pickup service.
  • Prohibiting visits at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
  • Limiting social get togethers, whether indoors or out, to no more than six people from two households.
  • Limiting worship services to 25 people when indoors and 50 people when outdoors.

Like clockwork, people are flocking to the stores and buying up toilet paper. YOU DO NOT NEED TO DO THIS! What you should do is head to Kind Leaf and stock up on cannabis as your entertainment options will be limited for the next few weeks. At Kind Leaf, you can pick up Blue City Diesel flower from Shadowbox Farms or Blackberry Octane #7 from Pruf Cultivar, or make a selection from your favorite Oregon farm. If you’re into extracts or concentrates, maybe Forbidden Fruit from Dab Factory or Oregrown’s Cold Filtered Nectar Primo Verde will treat you right.

No matter your lockdown and Thanksgiving plans are, it’ll be better with some of the best cannabis in the world. If you can’t make it to Kind Leaf, Eastern Oregon’s premier craft cannabis boutique in beautiful Pendleton, please do your best to shop at a local cannabis retailer to best help our local economy during these trying times. Please be safe and be kind to one another.

Order online via Leafly to save time. Discounts available for utilizing the pick-up window and for veterans, senior citizens, and OMMP patients.

Mainstream Media FINALLY Catching On: Cannabis Is Really Popular

Cannabis law reform advocates have been touting the growing public support for cannabis legalization, whether medically or recreationally, for several years now. Finally, the mainstream media is catching on, with headlines such as the AP’s “Americans across party lines, regions embrace marijuana” and NBC’s “Marijuana legalization is so popular it’s defying the partisan divide” out today.

Yes, the cannabis community won big at the 2020 ballot box, but this cross-party support has been evident for many years now. After years of Reefer Madness propaganda and disrespectful stereotypes, it does feel good to see that mainstream society has finally caught up with those of us that have been working to educate elected officials and the general public about the support we have to implement common sense cannabis laws.

It is extremely frustrating to see hard working entrepreneurs suffer under overly burdensome regulations, nonsensical restrictions, and a punishing tax code for absolutely zero reason. Throw in preposterous arrests and convictions across the country for cannabis, criminal proceedings that do absolutely zero good, and that frustration boils into anger.

Thankfully, there is plenty of hope as the frustration and anger of the cannabis community has turned into political advocacy that is really unlike any other issue of our day. An issue that does bring together both sides of a divided nation. The AP talked to a conservative South Dakota voter, who recognized how legal cannabis fits into his political ideology:

Bill Stocker could be considered the archetype of a conservative voter: He’s a retired Marine and former police officer who voted for President Donald Trump. But he’s also among the majority of South Dakota voters who broadly legalized marijuana this month.

Stocker, 61, said enforcing marijuana laws gets in the way of pursuing other drug crimes and called warnings about the ills of marijuana “a bunch of baloney” that even people in a Republican stronghold like South Dakota no longer believe.

South Dakota’s values of “personal responsibility and freedom” won out, said Stocker, who lives in Sioux Falls.

As NBC reported from Montana, medical cannabis patients and advocates have led the charge for more freedom by sharing the truth about cannabis:

The owner of a chain of medical marijuana dispensaries in Billings, Montana, credited passage of the recreational marijuana initiative to a years-long campaign by medical marijuana supporters to educate the public about the benefits of cannabis.

“There has been a considerable change in the political demographic because people are educated, because they know Aunt Margaret tried it for her cancer and she can eat,” said Richard Abromeit, owner of Montana Advanced Caregivers.

Advocates’ next goal is to get marijuana removed from a federal list of illegal drugs with no accepted medical use and high potential for abuse. The listing prevents labs from researching potential medical remedies using marijuana.

No matter where you stand on politics or culture, there is now a good chance that you support cannabis legalization or certainly have a loved one that does. As we move forward during these divided times, let’s do all that we can to reflect on what brings us together. Jack Herer is quoted as saying that “I don’t know if hemp is going to save the world, “but it’s the only thing that can.” Well, the cannabis community may not be saving the world, but we are at least doing our small part to bring the world closer together. And that’s something.

Oregon and Other Legal States Form the Cannabis Regulators Association

Cannabis legalization was a big winner at the 2020 ballot box and now that legalization has the support of 68% of Americans, we can expect that more states will move to end prohibition over the next few years. We will also be seeing more reform bills and debates at the federal level as well, with a legalization bill hopefully seeing the House floor next month. Each positive step forward moves us closer and closer to finally ending federal cannabis prohibition and ending the failed and harmful war on the cannabis community.

To help states share information and best practices, regulators have formed the Cannabis Regulators Association. It is positive step forward to see states combine resources and knowledge. This further demonstrates the mainstreaming of cannabis and that the prospects of legalizing at the federal level and instituting policies that treat cannabis businesses the same as any other industry are looking good. However, much-needed reforms are taking way too long.

Craft cannabis businesses like Kind Leaf and other small businesses have waited far too long to get access to banking services and to be taxed at a reasonable rate. Corporate companies, often with headquarters in other nations, can withstand these burdensome regulations, but small businesses, the drivers of our nation’s economy needed action yesterday. Hopefully, the sharing of states’ experiences will help move our government officials to act sooner rather than later. We have too many livelihoods on the line.

When you shop at Kind Leaf, you are getting the best selection with the best weekly deals while supporting a local family business that happily gives back to the local Pendleton community. Check out the menu, deals, and discounts (vets, senior citizens, OMMP patients, and for utilizing the pick-up window) on Leafly.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission announced that they were joining the new regulators organization yesterday in a press release:

November 12, 2020

State Regulators Start “Cannabis Regulators Association”

Oregon Liquor Control Commission joins organization

Group will help navigate cannabis regulations at federal, state, and local levels

Portland, OR — Today state cannabis regulators from across the United States announced formation of a non-partisan organization, the Cannabis Regulators Association (CANNRA), to better share institutional knowledge and regulatory best practices. Cannabis regulators from 19 states have joined in filing documents to establish CANNRA, which is being created in order to assist federal, state, and local jurisdictions that have approved or are weighing legalization of cannabis.

“CANNRA’s formation provides assurance to citizens and policy makers that cannabis regulation across the U.S. will be informed by best practices and the consolidated expertise of state regulators,” said Steve Marks, Executive Director of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. “Whether it is for recreational or medical purposes, states are on the cutting edge of a transition from a societal prohibition on cannabis use to systems that effectively provide for consumer protection standards in the commercialization of cannabis.”

For years, cannabis regulators across the country have relied on each other to share regulatory experiences, institutional expertise, and to provide assistance navigating the numerous evolving policy and regulatory issues associated with legalizing and regulating cannabis. Often the first step for state and local jurisdictions weighing legalization is to engage with regulators from established markets and programs. However, there has never been an organization to facilitate these interactions or help stakeholders find objective data and evidence-based approaches to policymaking and implementation.

“The Cannabis Regulators Association will provide a much needed forum for regulators to engage with each other to identify and develop best practices, create model policies that safeguard public health and safety, and promote regulatory certainty for industry participants,” said Norman Birenbaum, CANNRA’s inaugural president.

The Cannabis Regulators Association is not an advocacy group and takes no formal position for or against cannabis legalization, but rather seeks to provide government jurisdictions with unbiased information to help make informed decisions when considering whether or how to legalize or expand regulated cannabis. 

CANNRA will facilitate communication and information sharing between subject matter experts in regulatory approaches for industrial hemp, medical cannabis, and adult-use cannabis. This will include exchanges with research organizations, public health officials, policymakers, legal authorities, advocacy groups, and cannabis industry participants.

 “The association will strive to create and promote harmony and standardization across jurisdictions which choose to legalize and regulate cannabis,” said Birenbaum. Birenbaum currently serves as the Director of Cannabis Programs for New York State.  “The Cannabis Regulators Association will also work to ensure federal officials benefit from the vast experiences of states across the nation to ensure any changes to federal law adequately address states’ needs and priorities,” he said.

CANNRA founding members include the principal cannabis regulators from 19 states: Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, and Washington. 

Additional state regulators are expected to soon join CANNRA; CANNRA anticipates providing membership opportunities for county and municipal cannabis regulators in the near future. Membership is limited to regulators and representatives from relevant government offices. Membership in CANNRA is not available to industry participants or advocacy organizations.

CANNRA members will be able to access a national registry of member regulators, resources for cannabis policy development and staff training, and will have the ability to access, and participate in the development of model standards and best practices for cannabis regulation.

Members will also be eligible to attend exclusive “Regulator Roundtable” conferences and programs, and receive legislative analyses, policy tracking data, and bulletins on current issues and events in the cannabis industry and regulatory arena.

CANNRA’s executive officers will include Norman Birenbaum, Director of Cannabis Programs for New York State as President; Rick Garza, Director of the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board as First Vice President; Jim Burack, Director of Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division as Second Vice President; Andrew Brisbo, Executive Director of Michigan’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency as Third Vice President; and Tyler Klimas, Executive Director of Nevada’s Cannabis Compliance Board as Secretary Treasurer.

“Our intent in forming this organization is to have CANNRA serve as a resource for policy makers, elected officials, researchers, and other stakeholders to engage with regulators from across the country and receive unbiased information and recommendations regarding the impact and implementation of cannabis policies,” said Birenbaum.

For more information about the Cannabis Regulators Association or to inquire about membership please visit www.Cann-RA.org or email info@Cann-RA.org.