Month: June 2020

Bernie Sanders- Joe Biden Task Force Members Advocate For Cannabis Legalization

As Joe Biden campaigns against president Donald Trump, a task force comprised of members of his and Bernie Sanders’ supporters are meeting to discuss various issues. Biden, hoping to avoid a similar fate as 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, has taken the step of forming the task force to try and bridget he divide between progressive and moderate wings of the party.

As Marijuana Moment has covered, the criminal justice task force has been debating cannabis legalization. Progressives hope that the former vice president will get with the times, a supermajority of the party, and a strong majority of American voters, and move from merely supporting decriminalization to supporting legalization:

Most of the group—which consists of advisors appointed by both Biden and former primary rival Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT)—support ending cannabis prohibition, and advocates have held out hope that they would recommend that Biden adopt the policy platform in the run-up to the November election.

While some members have publicly talked about the issue since joining the task force, including Linn County, Iowa Supervisor Stacey Walker, who recently commented on the need for reform in light of racial disparities in marijuana criminalization, a new report from Politico appears to be the first confirmation that the group itself is actively considering a formal recommendation on the policy change.

From Politico’s report:

Multiple people said marijuana policy has been discussed on the criminal justice panel, one of the policy groups of the unity task force. Sanders appointees have advocated for legalization. Some Biden appointees personally support legalizing pot and have debated putting the policy in the panel’s recommendations to the former vice president, according to two people familiar with its deliberations.

Biden supports decriminalization, but has resisted calls to make cannabis legal—a reform endorsed by the majority of his primary opponents, including vice presidential contenders Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren. The criminalization of marijuana has contributed to the country’s mass incarceration problem, disproportionately affecting black men.

Chiraag Bains, a co-chair of the criminal justice task force tapped by Sanders, said Biden should “end the War on Drugs, including by legalizing marijuana.” He said those are his personal views, however, and he was not speaking as a leader of the task force.

It will be interesting to see what direction Joe Biden plans to take, especially if his pick to be his running mate supports legalization, like frontrunner Kamala Harris. With a big lead in the polls, the Democrat may want to play it safe, but he’ll be playing it wrong if he thinks opposing legalization is safe.

Biden will run the risk of getting outflanked by Donald Trump on the issue, who not only wants to win for himself, but may want to throw a lifeline to Republican Colorado Senator Cory Gardner who could use a win on cannabis. Only time will tell, but both presidential candidates would be wise to adhere to the will of the voters and call for an end to the failed and racist policy of cannabis prohibition.

Dr. Lester Grinspoon, Carl Sagan’s Best Friend and Cannabis Community Giant, Passes Away at 92

Dr. Lester Grinspoon, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School has been one of the most important voices in the cannabis community, helping speak truth to power, passed away this morning, the morning after celebrating his 92nd birthday. Grinspoon’s status as a Harvard professor and his friendship with renowned scientist Carl Sagan were instrumental in dispelling common cannabis myths and stereotypes.

Dr. Grinspoon’s 1971 book, Marihuana Reconsidered, about the real effects of cannabis and its place in society was a landmark publication for the movement to reform our nation’s unjust laws. Just two years later, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize personal use, kicking off a wave of decriminalization laws across the nation and laying the foundation of our fight for freedom and science that still continues to this day.

Lester Grinspoon’s son, Dr. Peter Grinspoon, who has followed in his father’s path in promoting science and truth, posted about his father’s passing on Twitter:

Vice Magazine profiled Grinspoon’s relationship with the late, great Carl Sagan, and cannabis, back in 2013:

Dr. Lester Grinspoon’s interest in marijuana dates back to 1967, the year he decided to research the subject sufficiently enough to convince his best friend—who just happened to be Carl Sagan—and a few other associates to stop smoking the stuff. While the internationally renowned astronomer never publicly acknowledged his use of cannabis, the bestselling author and host of “Cosmos” did partake frequently and enthusiastically in private, invariably encouraging his straight-laced companion Lester to join in.

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Four years later, despite facing pressure at Harvard not to touch the subject, Grinspoon published Marihuana Reconsidered (1971) to document his findings. The bestselling book described, among other things, a decades-long government propaganda campaign undertaken to keep marijuana illegal at all costs.

In addition to an authoritative, scientific refutation of the many myths then commonly accepted about cannabis, the book included an essay from a man in his mid-30s identified only as Mr. X. Writing under a pseudonym, Carl Sagan explained that his support for ending marijuana prohibition was not just political, but also deeply personal:

I do not consider myself a religious person in the usual sense, but there is a religious aspect to some highs. The heightened sensitivity in all areas gives me a feeling of communion with my surroundings, both animate and inanimate. Sometimes a kind of existential perception of the absurd comes over me and I see with awful certainty the hypocrises and posturing of myself and my fellow men. And at other times, there is a different sense of the absurd, a playful and whimsical awareness. Both of these senses of the absurd can be communicated, and some of the most rewarding highs I’ve had have been in sharing talk and perceptions and humor. Cannabis brings us an awareness that we spend a lifetime being trained to overlook and forget and put out of our minds.

Everyone working to end cannabis prohibition today stands upon the shoulders of giants who sacrificed so much before us. Dr. Lester Grinspoon is one of those giants. All of us enjoying more freedom today owe him a bit of gratitude. May the legendary giant rest in power.

I’ll leave you with this beautiful sentiment posted by his son. It brought a smile to my face and tears to my eyes.

Gallup: 70% of Americans View Cannabis Use as Morally Acceptable

It is easy to see that cannabis use has become more morally acceptable in American society. More and more states have passed various legalization laws, more federal politicians are embracing legalization, polling shows strong support, and you cannabis is being discussed more within our mainstream culture. A new Gallup poll now shows that 70% of Americans view cannabis as morally acceptable, up five points from last year, just below gambling (71%).

From Gallup:

Americans View 13 of 21 Issues as Morally Acceptable

Of the 21 issues included in the latest poll, all but five have been measured since the early 2000s, and 13 are considered morally acceptable to majorities of Americans.

  • At least seven in 10 U.S. adults say birth control, drinking alcohol, getting a divorce, sex between an unmarried man and woman, gambling, and smoking marijuana are acceptable moral behaviors.
  • Likewise, two-thirds of Americans consider gay or lesbian relations, having a baby outside of marriage and medical research using human embryonic stem cells as acceptable.
  • In addition to the death penalty, medical testing on animals, buying and wearing clothing made of animal fur, and doctor-assisted suicide are morally acceptable to narrower majorities.

While utilizing cannabis is deemed more moral more so by liberals at 83%, a majority of conservatives (51%) now feel that using cannabis is a morally acceptable choice. Once again, it is great to see progress across the political spectrum, but the overall results remind us that we still have a lot of work to be done to combat decades of Reefer Madness propaganda. Drinking alcohol is viewed as morally acceptable by 86% of Americans when cannabis use is clearly the safer joice. Also, the fact that 28% of Americans still view cannabis use as immoral can have huge implications in housing, employment, child custody, and other aspects of our lives.

Step by step, we’re making change for the better, but revolutions are marathons, not sprints. Keep sharing your experiences and the truth about cannabis and we’ll continue making strides for true freedom and equality.

Featured photo credit: Darrin Harris Frisby/Drug Policy Alliance

Would Donald Trump Sign a Cannabis Legalization Bill Passed by Congress?

Donald Trump’s position on cannabis has been tough to pin down. During the 2016 campaign, he stated that he supported medical use and that he was a believer in states’ rights regarding legalization. However, the hiring of Reefer Madness prohibitionist Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, signing statements regarding his administration’s ultimate right to enforce federal cannabis laws regardless of state legalization laws, and comments by members of his staff, have caused confusion.

That confusion has only been exacerbated by a recent interview of Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, who has a an anti-cannabis history, and the ensuring Twitter beef that sprung out of the interview with reporter Matt Laslo. Marijuana Moment reported:

President Donald Trump’s stance on marijuana legalization became the jumping off point for a spat between a top White House aide, Republican operatives and a reporter on Thursday after Chief of Staff Mark Meadows laughed off a question about the prospects of broad cannabis reform advancing before the election in November.

But the controversy wasn’t solely about the administration’s position on legalization; rather the dispute centered on how freelance reporter Matt Laslo characterized the conversation on Twitter, where he said that Meadows suggested pro-cannabis reform Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) “has been misleading voters on marijuana” and that “Trump has no plan to lift a finger on cannabis legalization or even normalization.”

Laslo also shared audio from the interview and wrote that it showed Meadows “mockingly laugh when I ask if Trump plans to carry through on his promise to [Gardner] to relax federal marijuana laws.”

Some Republicans pushed back on Laslo’s characterization of Meadows’ response and the implications that Colorado Senator Cory Gardner has been misleading his constituents. Gardner is seen as very vulnerable Republican who the Democrats hope to defeat this November. With legalization very popular in Colorado, the issue is an important issue for his re-election prospects.

Laslo responded to his Republican critics on Twitter:

As Politico reported, any type of cannabis legalization legislation would help Senator Gardner, but he hasn’t been able to move the needle in the Republican-controlled Senate:

But so far, the GOP’s most ardent promoter of cannabis in Congresshasn’t delivered any legislative wins for the state’s $1.7 billion, rapidly growing cannabis industry, where marijuana was legalized in 2012. The two major cannabis bills Gardner sponsors — one to increase access to banking and capital for the cannabis industry and one to codify federal protections for states that choose to legalize marijuana — have not advanced in the Senate at all, despite the banking bill passing the House with a bipartisan majority last fall. Gardner does not support any bill that would legalize cannabis nationwide.

“At some point, I have to go to Cory Gardner and say, ‘Why should the industry continue to support you?’” said Marijuana Policy Project’s Don Murphy, a former Republican lawmaker in Maryland. “I know you’re trying, but you’re not getting anything.”

With so many issues facing our nation, it seems unlikely that cannabis legalization legislation will be passed by Congress. With a lot of negative stories dominating the news cycle, it would certainly benefit Trump and Gardner to have a feel-good cannabis story make some headlines, but each day that passes, it seems more and more unlikely this term. We’ll see what the next four years will hold.

Juneteenth Commemorates the End of Slavery, but Slavery Still Exists in American Prisons

When you are fighting for equality and civil rights, it is extremely important to celebrate your victories. There are so many things wrong in this world, that we can easily get overwhelmed and burnt out unless we take the time to find joy. After celebrating, we activists then can move onto the next political or cultural battle, recharged and ready to create more positive change.

Like many, my heart is filled with hope seeing so many people taking to the streets and getting active fighting for freedom. Juneteenth, the day commemorating slavery finally ending in the United States, is certainly a day to reflect and celebrate important victories. However, after acknowledging the day, we need to remember that slavery actually still exists in American prisons as The Atlantic has covered:

In the shining promise of freedom that was the Thirteenth Amendment, a sharp exception was carved out. Section 1 of the Amendment provides: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Simply put: Incarcerated persons have no constitutional rights in this arena; they can be forced to work as punishment for their crimes.

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In this new era of prison industry, the criminal “justice” system, the state determined the size of the worker pool. Scores of recently freed slaves and their descendants now labored to generate revenue for the state under a Jim Crow regime.

More than a century later, our prison labor system has only grown. We now incarcerate more than 2.2 million people, with the largest prison population in the world, and the second highest incarceration rate per capita. Our prison populations remain racially skewed. With few exceptions, inmates are required to work if cleared by medical professionals at the prison. Punishments for refusing to do so include solitary confinement, loss of earned good time, and revocation of family visitation. For this forced labor, prisoners earn pennies per hour, if anything at all.

A significant number of convicted prisoners can be safely released, as Time Magazine comprised a team of criminologists, lawyers, and statistical researchers to analyze criminal codes, convictions, and sentences to write the report How Many Americans Are Unnecessarily Incarcerated?. Time reported:

We found that approximately 39% of the nationwide prison population (576,000 people) is behind bars with little public safety rationale. And they can be released, significantly and safely cutting our prison population.

How did we get to this number? First, many people who are in prison shouldn’t have been sent there in the first place. For example, we found that 25% of prisoners (364,000 people), almost all non-violent, lower-level offenders, would be better served by alternatives to incarceration such as treatment, community service, or probation. Second, another 14% (212,000 prisoners) have already served long sentences for more serious crimes and can be safely set free.

Releasing these inmates would save $20 billion annually, enough to employ 270,000 new police officers, 360,000 probation officers, or 327,000 school teachers.

The war on cannabis and greater Drug War have created a New Jim Crow system that not only deprives people of their freedom and educational and employment opportunities, but also perpetuates modern day slavery. Even for people that don’t get sent to prison solely for cannabis or other nonviolent drug offenses, these victimless “crimes” put people in the system in the first place, or end of being probation and parole violations that end up imprisoning them. Let’s reflect this Juneteenth, but remember that we have a lot of fights left to win, including truly ending slavery in the United States of America.

Nevada Pardons Over 15,000 with Cannabis Convictions, Let’s Do This Nationwide

Cannabis prohibition has always been a terrible policy, but it is getting even more embarrassing to defend as each day passes. Reefer Madness prohibitionists can try all they want to rely upon decades of propaganda to prop up the racist and failed war on cannabis, but, when given the chance, voters would legalize nationwide. Even many that oppose cannabis use now see that our country has too many serious issues to tackle to waste limited resources citing, arresting, jailing, prosecuting, and jailing people for cannabis.

Nevada has taken a great step in the fight to right the wrongs of cannabis prohibition by pardoning over 15,000 people of their convictions. These folks can now become full members of society, getting their Second Amendment rights back and having their ability to vote restored, among other rights and privileges that have been denied to them for far too long.

Marijuana Moment reported:

The measure extends unconditional clemency to individuals with possession convictions of up to one ounce from January 1986 to January 2017. It was introduced to the board by Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) last week.

“Today is an historic day for those who were convicted of what has long been considered a trivial crime, and is now legal under Nevada law,” the governor said in a press release. “Since the passage of [adult-use legalization] in 2016 and the decriminalization of possession for small amounts of marijuana, many Nevadans have had these minor offenses remain on their records, in some cases as a felony. This resolution aims to correct that and fully restore any rights lost as a result of these convictions.”

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“Today we took another step toward justice by pardoning thousands of Nevadans for actions that Nevadans decided should no longer be illegal,” state Attorney General Aaron Ford (D) said. “I’m proud to work alongside Governor Sisolak to make it easier for these Nevadans to get jobs, housing, and financial aid for college. Together, we’re making criminal justice reform a priority across Nevada.”

We need to take this movement to pardon people persecuted by the war on cannabis nationwide and look for ways that we can right wrongs of our past. Too many tax-paying-otherwise-law-abiding citizens have had their educational and employment opportunities squashed by a racist and harmful policy that a vast majority of Americans now realize was a mistake. Legalization is great, but it’s just a first step of reconciling the sins of our past when it comes to cannabis prohibition.

Unite Oregon Helping Lead the Call to Divest Cannabis Taxes from the Portland Police Bureau

As civil rights protests following the death of George Floyd have entered the third week of people taking to the streets, a remarkable set of reforms have already occurred. Those of us that have been involved with drug policy and criminal justice reform for awhile understand that much-needed changes can take years, if not decades, if happen even at all. To see new laws and regulations already implemented across the nation, from Louisville, Kentucky, passing the Breonna Taylor Law banning no-knock raids to New York finally making the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act law, and even some action taking place at the federal level, has been heartening. But much more needs to be done.

Unite Oregon has helped take the lead on reforming police funding, including calling upon the City of Portland to divest local cannabis tax dollars from funding the Portland Police Bureau. Unite’s petition calling for action includes this provision: “Divest City of Portland Cannabix Tax funds from the PPB budget and invest them into reparations for those harmed by the War on Drugs, which disproportionately targeted BIPOC communities.”

As OPB reported Portland’s local cannabis tax hasn’t been split up as voters’ intended:

When Portland voters approved a 3% tax on recreational cannabis sales in 2016, they expected the funds would benefit marijuana business owners and individuals who were negatively affected when cannabis was illegal.

report from the Portland City Auditor reveals that’s not the case. Instead, most of the collected taxes have gone toward shortages in the city’s general fund and specifically to police and transportation programs.

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Tax revenue of $3.6 million in the 2018 fiscal year and $4.6 million in 2019 primarily went toward public safety. Small business/prohibition effects received only 16% of the revenue and drug and alcohol programs received 5%.

The Portland City Council is expected to divest the local cannabis tax from the Portland Police Bureau’s budget, but as usual in the fight for civil rights, much more needs to be done. As Oregon Governor Kate Brown has called a special legislative session to deal with police accountability and the coronavirus pandemic, we can expect the issue of cannabis dollars funding law enforcement to stay in the headlines.

UPDATE: The Portland City Council did indeed cut $15 million from the police budget, including local cannabis tax dollars.

Stand Up to Bullying by Purchasing Kind Lips Lip Balm at Kind Leaf

The world can be a cruel and dark place. Every morning, I check the news headlines on my phone, even though I keep telling myself not to, and I’m often feeling down about the state of the world. We are living in times of turmoil with the coronavirus pandemic still raging across the globe, civil unrest as people take to the streets protesting systemic racism, and there seems to be a dearth of leadership helping uplift our spirits.

I have to seek solace in positive stories and in my personal relationships filled with love and laughter. I also seek for ways to give back, whether it’s donating blood to the Red Cross or pitching in a few bucks with a nonprofit doing good work. I was so happy to learn about Kind Lips, a lip balm company that donates 20% of its net profits to anti-bullying organizations. When you can purchase a great product, and Kind Lips has a variety of flavors to fit your needs, and support a good cause, it’s truly a win-win.

Kind Leaf, Eastern Oregon’s premier craft cannabis boutique has been promoting #BeKind as a motto since its inception, making the dispensary a natural ally for Kind Lips. When you shop at Kind Leaf you know that you are helping a true Oregon small business that supports the local Pendleton economy and gives back to local families in need, especially with its Kind Tree Christmas program. So, peruse the best cannabis strain selection in the Great Northwest and pick up some Kind Lips lip balm that is helping combat bullying. It’s truly a win-win-win.

For more information about bullying and resources to help end bullying visit stopbullying.gov.

Federal Representatives Urge Colleagues Legalize Cannabis to Promote Racial Justice

Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer made cannabis legalization and drug decriminalization a part of his police accountability plan recently and now he, and Representative Barbara Lee, are urging their colleagues to legalize cannabis as part of the movement to bring about racial justice. Cannabis prohibition has been a racist policy from its inception and the consequences have definitely had a racist impact as Black Americans are much more likely to be arrested and imprisoned for cannabis, even though use among races is about equal. Marijuana Moment reported on the Reps. Blumenauer and Lee’s “Dear Colleague” letter:

“We have all seen the pernicious effects of selective enforcement of cannabis prohibition across the country, and it is not just in red states or rural Republican America,” the letter states. “We have seen for the last 50 years the cannabis prohibition used disproportionately against people of color, especially young Black men. The use of cannabis is fairly uniform across different racial groups, but the people caught up in the net of cannabis enforcement are heavily skewed towards these young Black men.”

“It is time that we as Democrats take a stand against this pernicious hold-over from Richard Nixon’s blatant attempt at criminalizing the behavior of African Americans,” the two lawmakers, who are co-chairs of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, wrote, adding that prohibition has contributed to mass incarceration across the country.

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“We urge you to examine these issues, the legislative options, and to make federal cannabis reform part of the communities’ support in their quest for racial justice. We have information in greater specificity, if you wish, and have other pieces of legislation that will improve this tragic situation. Regardless, we hope you will be mindful of this rank injustice and the overwhelming support, which includes 93 percent of voters under 30. The cannabis reform train has left the station.”

As federal lawmakers debate legislation to address police accountability, reduce violent encounters with law enforcement, and bring about more racial justice, they should heed Reps. Blumenauer and Lee’s call to end cannabis prohibition. A whopping 40% of all arrests are for cannabis. Each law enforcement encounter has the chance of turning violent and each conviction can unnecessarily deprive someone of their freedom and employment, educational, and housing opportunities. It’s time that Congress follow the will of the voters and end federal cannabis prohibition. It won’t solve our racial issues, but it is one piece of the puzzle.

Portland Owes Trail Blazers Great Cliff Robinson an Apology for His Cannabis Arrest

Clifford Robinson had a great 18-year NBA career that included an All-Star appearance, a Sixth Man of the Year Award, and two second-team All-Defensive honors. In many ways, the 7-1 forward/center was ahead of his time and his style would be perfect for today’s NBA that features many more outside shooting big men that can run the floor effectively and play defense. The Oregonian named Cliff the 9th best Trail Blazer of all-time and if anyone has better stats than him, they are in the Pro Basketball Hall of Fame, where “Uncle Cliffy” belongs. In our championship-obsessed culture, I sincerely believe that Robinson would be in the Hall of Fame if the 1990s Trail Blazers would have won an NBA title, instead of finishing second to the “Bad Boys” Pistons and the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls in 1990 & 1992.

After his fantastic NBA career, Cliff Robinson has become an outspoken proponent of ending cannabis prohibition, a racist policy that has had too many harmful consequences for our society, disproportionately for people of color. Unfortunately, Robinson’s playing days were unnecessarily interrupted due to illogical cannabis laws and, most distressingly, he was the victim of a SWAT raid by the Portland police, a traumatic encounter for which he deserves an apology.

KPTV reported on the fact that Robinson’s social media manager, Chris Young, started a petition urging the City of Portland to apologize to the Trail Blazers great:

Police blocked his car and several officers surrounded him. They found marijuana inside and that sparked a national news story at the time.

Young believes it was a case of racial profiling, and even though it happened long ago, he says Robinson deserves an apology.

“As days turn into weeks and weeks turn to months and months to years, or Cliff’s case, decades, unfortunately people forget about it. But the person it happened to doesn’t forget about it. People bring it up and and say it was a long time ago and you need to get over it and move on, but the person it happens to doesn’t move on. It’s traumatic and stays with them for their life. Whether it happened last Tuesday or 20 years ago, if it’s wrong, it’s wrong,” Young said.

NBC Sports has also covered the petition:

Robinson was worried the incident would put unwarranted controversy on himself heading into free agency and negatively affect the perception of the Trail Blazers, who were teetering on the Jail Blazers days, over what Robinson viewed as extreme abuse of public resources and blatant racial profiling.

“This perception of our team is that we have a bunch of guys who are shady individuals,″ Robinson said at the press conference in 1997. “I don’t do anything but try my best to represent myself, represent the Trail Blazers and represent Portland on and off the court as best as I can.″

The former Trail Blazer would leave Portland for Phoenix that offseason. 

In full disclosure, I’m friends with social media manager Chris Young and have had the pleasure to hang out with Cliff Robinson a few times, although it would be presumptuous of me to say that he’s a friend. I can say that the man can sing and if you get the chance to karaoke with him, you should. Regardless of my personal relationships with those involved, I believe that all nonviolent cannabis users deserve an apology for their arrests.

It’s time that the United States make amends for its racist past and attoning for cannabis prohibition is an important part of addressing systemic racism. Black Lives Matter and SWAT raids like those that Cliff Robinson survived unnecessarily put Black lives in danger. Portland, Oregon, AKA Rip City needs to apologize.

The Change.org Petition in full:

Demand That The City Of Portland Apologize To Cliff Robinson For Racial Profiling Incident

In the summer of 1997 Portland Trail Blazer Clifford Robinson, his brothers, and friends were the subject of blatant racial profiling by Portland (Oregon) police. Robinson was seen entering his vehicle with paintball guns, the cops were called by someone that reported that Robinson and his party had assault rifles, and a public safety alert was broadcast on local and national media.

Robinson’s vehicle, along with its occupants, was subjected to a paramilitary-style blockade near the Portland waterfront, which was widely publicized. Heavily armed Portland police did not find assault rifles in Robinson’s vehicle for obvious reasons (there weren’t any), however, they did locate remnants of cannabis in the vehicle. Despite the cannabis being outside of the reach of where Robinson was located in the vehicle (driver seat), Robinson was charged with possession of cannabis, presumably because of his celebrity status.

That cannabis charge was widely covered by national media instead of the extreme abuse of public resources and blatant racial profiling that Robinson and his party had to endure.

This blatant racial profiling incident has since gone unaddressed. That is unacceptable. Please sign this petition to demand that the City of Portland apologize for this incident. A public apology will never fix the past, however, it can at least clear the record and make it widely known that what happened to Robinson and his party in 1997 was shameful. The City of Portland can never fully move forward if it cannot acknowledge the harms that it created in the past. Thank you for signing this petition and sharing it with everyone that you know.

More information regarding the racial profiling incident described in this petition can be found here: https://apnews.com/f7eb349befd2dc8e9a78f99950ada42d